Follow Cohen Seglias on LinkedIn Follow Cohen Seglias on LinkedIn
Follow Cohen Seglias on Twitter Follow Cohen Seglias on Twitter
Follow Cohen Seglias on Facebook Follow Cohen Seglias on Facebook
Follow Cohen Seglias on Youtube Follow Cohen Seglias on Youtube
30 Years in Business
Learn more About Us
Browse by Last Name
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

    Government Contracting Database

    Defacto Debarment

    Defacto debarment occurs when an agency bars a contractor from competing for government contracts for a certain period of time without following the applicable debarment procedures found in the Federal Acquisition Regulations. See FAR § 9.406-3. In brief, the regulations require that an agency provide the contractor with a notice and opportunity to be heard prior to debarment. 

    Previous courts considering this matter have established a high standard for plaintiffs to meet when trying to establish a defacto debarment claim. To succeed, a contractor must demonstrate a “systematic effort by the procuring agency to reject all of the bidder’s contract bids.” CRCMarineServ., Inc. v United States, 41 Fed. CL 66, 84 (1998) (citing Stapp Towing, Inc. v United States, 34 Fed. CL 300, 312 (1995)). Two options exist to establish a defacto debarment claim: 1) by an agency’s statement that it will not award the contractor future contracts; or 2) by an agency’s conduct demonstrating that it will not award the contractor future contracts. Id.; TLT Const. Corp. v. United States, 50 Fed.Cl. 212, 215–16 (2001); and Avkare, Inc. v. United States, 125 Fed. Cl. 11, 29 (2016), aff’d, 673 F. App’x 1011 (Fed. Cir. 2017). 

    Updated: June 15, 2018 

    Looking for additional government contracting resources?

    Search Our Database

    Capabilities